Guide Expositions on the Book of Psalms: Psalms LXXIII - CL

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The psalmist calls the peoples of the earth to praise God because the earth has yielded its increase and all the earth will respond Reviewing the development of Yahweh choice of Mount Zion, the psalmist pictures the movement from wilderness to conquest and occupation Realizing that the strength of God is displayed in Israel and given to His people, the psalmist calls the nations to praise the Rider of the heavens Turning to Yahweh with his cry for help, the psalmist describes his lamentable state Petitioning Yahweh to save him from imminent death, the psalmist expresses his confidence that Yahweh knows his distress and will punish the enemies Confident that Yahweh will set him on high, the psalmist resolves to praise; confident that God will save Zion, the psalmist anticipates the psalmist of creation The psalmist prays that those who seek God will rejoice when he is quickly delivered The Future: Because he has trusted all of his life, the aging psalmist vows to continue to praise God for the deliverance to come The psalmist prays that God will give righteous judgments to the king so that he may rule in righteousness and peace on behalf of the oppressed The psalmist anticipates that the kingdom will extend from sea to sea over many kings The psalmist attests that the king is worthy of such honor and power and dominion because he is savior of the oppressed The psalmist repeats his prayer for the peace and prosperity of the kingdom [giving glory to God; Amen] The psalmist Asaph tells of his doubts which arose when he compared the life of the worldling with himself The psalmist Asaph confesses the sinfulness of his doubts and acknowledges that he overcame his doubts by considering the end of the wicked and the glory of the righteous Asaph utters his cry of complaint to God that He not forget His people and Zion Asaph laments the destruction of the enemy who has devastated the sanctuary and jeopardized the nation Asaph appeals to God for help, reminding Him of past deliverances through nature Asaph appeals to God to look on His covenant so that the people would not suffer the reproach of these blasphemers On behalf of the people, Asaph acknowledges the wondrous works of God who will establish judgment at the set time Asaph warns the wicked to humble themselves before God the Judge if they would escape the cup Asaph vows to sing praises to God who cuts of the wicked, but exalts the righteous Asaph sees hits fearful God of light destroying the wicked and delivering the righteous Asaph utters his sorrow and disquietude in the night when he cries earnestly to God without answer The psalmist calls the people to hear his well-known parable which generation has passed on to generation for obedience to the law The psalmist laments how Ephraim turned back and forgot the works of Yahweh The psalmist traces the marvelous things that Yahweh did in their past history that men forgot before they rebelled and sinned Asaph complains how Jerusalem has been destroyed and the saints slaughtered because of the scoffing enemies Asaph prays that Yahweh will not remember their sins, but avenge their destruction Asaph promises that the people, the sheep of His pasture will be eternally grateful Asaph appeals to the Shepherd of the sheep to help the tribes by turning His face to them and saving them Asaph laments the awful calamity of the nations that brings mockery and asks God to turn and cause His ace to shine on them and save them Asaph describes the blessing and cursing of the nation under the figure of a vine that flourished and then was destroyed, and then he calls on God to turn and cause salvation to His vine Asaph continues the picture by describing the destruction of the vine and calling for help from Yahweh whom they will serve, and then repeats the refrain that God should turn and save them The psalmist summons the congregation to the festival which Yahweh ordained as a memorial to His great deliverance The psalmist declares the meanings of those events when God delivered them from bondage The psalmist expresses the wish that Israel would turn to Yahweh and find great blessing finest of wheat and honey from the Rock Asaph calls on God to arise because He, being the Judge par excellence , shall inherit the earth 8.

Asaph laments the great danger presented by the enemies that have taken counsel to crush Judah from all sides Asaph prays for a complete overthrow by all the powers that God musters, appealing to former deliverances from many enemies The pilgrim expresses his intense yearning to appear before Yahweh of armies The pilgrim asserts that the reason for his deep yearning to appear before God: he is confident that God will answer his petition Prayer to God: The psalmist acknowledges how God restored the nation from captivity and forgave their sins, and then prays for Him once again to turn away His wrath Promise of God: The psalmist receives an oracle from God that promises salvation to His saints Faith of the psalmist: The psalmist is confident that Yahweh will deliver the nation with righteousness and peace Because God is good and forgiving, David petitions Him to preserve him in mercy Because God is incomparably able to do anything, David prays, asking for instruction from God Because the proud have risen up against him, David asks for strength from his loving God, asking for a pledge The psalmist describes how the nations are gathered unto the city of God as children that are born there The psalmist describes the joy of those who sing and dance for their pleasure is in Zion 7.

The psalmist steadfastly affirms that he has cried to the God of his salvation in the midst of his great affliction a. The psalmist reaffirms his steadfast faith in praying for deliverance for he will not be able to praise Yahweh in the grave 9b The psalmist reiterates his faith in praying from the midst of terrible and fierce affliction Introduction: The psalmist vows to praise Yahweh for His faithfulness and love in establishing the covenant Motivation 5 : The psalmist praises Yahweh for His great and incomparable attributes and his marvelous works done for those who trust Remembrance: The psalmist rehearses to Yahweh all of the promises made to David in the Covenant Petition: The psalmist laments the fact that the promises of the covenant have apparently been forgotten since the king is afflicted and defeated, and then prays for Yahweh to remember His oath to David The psalmist recognizes that it is good to praise the Most High because He has done great things in triumph over the wicked The psalmist anticipates the scattering of the enemy and the exaltation and blessing of the righteous because they trust in Yahweh who is on High The psalmist exults in the fact that Yahweh reigns in majesty and establishes the throne over the world The psalmist is convinced that the testimonies of Yahweh are sure because His house is holy 5.

The psalmist calls on Yahweh to render His vengeance on the proud who have wickedly oppressed and afflicted The psalmist calls on the proud to consider their ways which God truly sees for Yahweh will not forsake his people The psalmist announces that righteous Yahweh delivers him and brings retribution to the wicked The psalmist acknowledges the greatness of Yahweh as a King above all gods and exhorts the congregation to worship Him The psalmist warns the congregation against unbelief such as that which prevented their fathers in the wilderness from entering the rest 7b The psalmist calls upon all the earth to sing to Yahweh and proclaim His salvation because He is greater than all the gods and His temple is gloriously strong The psalmist commands the tribes of the nations to give due glory to Him and worship Him for by His reign the world will finally be righteous The psalmist calls upon nature to rejoice because Yahweh will judge the earth in righteousness and truth Conclusion: The psalmist calls upon the saints to hate evil and to acknowledge gladly their holy Savoir The psalmist calls for a new song to Yahweh because He has displayed His loyal love and truth by saving Israel in the sight of the nations The psalmist calls upon all the earth to rejoice greatly before Yahweh who has begun to reign prophetic because He will judge the earth in righteousness The psalmist offers praise to Yahweh for His righteous reign in the earth and calls on the congregation to exalt their God because He is holy The psalmist offers praise to Yahweh because of His merciful dealings to the fathers and then calls on the congregation to exalt and worship their God because He is holy The psalmist exhorts the congregation to serve Him with gladness because He is their creator The psalmist exhorts the congregation to enter His courts with thanksgiving because He is good and faithful The king resolves to consider the way of purity and to walk with a pure heart 2.

The king clarifies the way of purity for himself, his court, and his capital Complaint: The psalmist complains that he is overwhelmed and smitten by the reproach of the enemies Consolation: The psalmist finds consolation in the fact that Yahweh, who abides forever in Zion, will not forsake those who love Him, but deliver them so that others will praise Epilogue: Yahweh had weakened him, but since Yahweh dwells forever, the psalmist prayed not to die prematurely In gratitude from his own soul, David reviews the mercies of God granted to him forgiveness, healing, redemption, loyal love, renewal In alluding to the facts of history, David discovers the covenant relationship Yahweh made with frail sinners gives hope IN view of his dominion over the earth, the psalmist David calls all of creation to bless Him The psalmist praises Yahweh for His greatness and love to Israel as He remembered His promises to them Praising God for His goodness, the psalmist prays for help from their captivity , confessing that they have sinned The psalmist traces the rebellious acts of the people in their wilderness wanderings and in the holy land Call to praise: The psalmist calls the redeemed of the Lord to praise Yahweh Cause for praise: The psalmist portrays the redemption of Yahweh by certain pictures David is convinced that Yahweh will exult in the subjugation of the tribes of the earth David calls for help from Yahweh against His evil enemies who surround him with evil David heaps his curses upon the enemy, wishing that he be made desolate and dispossessed because he the enemy has loved cursing David prays to Yahweh for help in defending against his enemies because he is in great need David describes the holy army of the King-Priest Messiah as he comes suddenly to conquer The army of Messiah will be willingly offering themselves in holy array for the appearance 3.

Messiah will be a priest after the order of Melchisedek and thus provides for their holy array. The psalmist praises Yahweh in the council for His great and marvelous works The psalmist concludes that the fear of Yahweh is the beginning of wisdom for His praise endures forever The psalmist enumerates the blessings that come to the man whose righteousness endures The psalmist promises that because he is righteous the one who trust in Yahweh will be exalted to the grief of the wicked who must perish Call to Praise: The psalmist calls upon the servants of Yahweh to praise Him who is worthy of praise for all time in all the earth The psalmist recalls how the sea fled and the mountains trembled when Israel came from bondage in Egypt to dominion in Judah The psalmist calls the earth to tremble at the presence of Yahweh who brought water from the rock Proclamation to praise: The psalmist announces that he will praise because he can depend on God Looking back at the time of need: The psalmist reports his deliverance to the people in a didactic manner Renewed vow of praise: The psalmist will acknowledge God because the death of a saint is precious in the eyes of Yahweh Congregation: The people praise Yahweh for his loyal love that endures forever Psalmist: The psalmist rehearses how Yahweh answered him in his distress and cut off the enemies, enabling him to live and enter the gates of righteousness The psalmist rejoices over the great day of salvation as the Stone, the capstone of the nation, comes in the name of Yahweh The pilgrim psalmist prays for deliverance from deceitful and lying tongues The pilgrim psalmist, addressing the wicked, questions what will be done to them The pilgrim psalmist, lamenting his predicament, declares that his neighbors are for war, but he is for peace Pilgrim speaks: The pilgrim expresses his need for help as he contemplates the journey to Jerusalem and affirms his faith in Yahweh, the Creator of heaven and earth for his help The psalmist praises Jerusalem as the spiritual and civic center of the nation The psalmist calls the people to pray for the peace and prosperity of Jerusalem because of god and His people The pilgrim calls for mercy because the people are filled with contempt from the scoffing of the proud The pilgrim realizes that if Yahweh had not been on their side, the nations would have swallowed them up The pilgrim blesses Yahweh who broke the snare and allowed them to escape The psalmist describes the security of the righteous believers, comparing them to the unshakable mountains around Jerusalem The psalmist predicts that those who do turn aside to their wickednesses will suffer the same fate as the wicked and offers a prayer for the peace of Israel 5.

Petition: The restored exiles pray for the full restoration of the captivity to Zion 4. Confidence: The restored exiles find encouragement from the principle of sowing and reaping The pilgrim epitomizes the providence of Yahweh in the reward of children that are capable of defending the family The pilgrim announces the bliss of the life of a man who fears God and walks in His ways 1. The pilgrim extols the blessings of the good life of such a man who fears God The pilgrim prays for further blessings on the man who fears God, and calls for the peace of Jerusalem Praise: Israel the restored exiles declares that God delivered them from the wicked.

Addressing Yahweh, the psalmist petitions Yahweh to look favorably upon him with confidence because Yahweh forgives sin Addressing the congregation, the psalmist testifies that he is hoping in Yahweh, and exhorts Israel also to hope for their redemption from iniquity The pilgrim declares his humility in that he has not attempted anything haughty 1. Israel petitions Yahweh to remember the vow of David concerning a permanent dwelling-place for the ark, resolving to worship Him there in the expectation that He will visit them with glory, righteousness, and power Thesis: David declares that it is good and pleasant for brethren to dwell in unity 1.

Emblems: David compares this unity to the sacred oil of consecration and the morning dew of the mountains The pilgrim directs his greeting to those who stand watch at the sanctuary The pilgrim prays that Yahweh who made haven and earth would bless them out of Zion 3. Cause for praise: The psalmist explains the cause for praise as being the marvelous acts of His loyal love The captured psalmist calls for Yahweh to remember the evil done to them and requite it David anticipates the praise of all the kings of the earth for Yahweh because he delivers the lowly and does not judge by human standards of greatness David develops his faith by expressing his confidence that Yahweh will deliver him according to loyal love David exhibits his loyalty to Yahweh by opposing the wicked enemies of God and by submitting his life to the penetrating search of Yahweh to determine his loyalties to God who leads him in the way everlasting The psalmist prays for deliverance from the wicked who plan wicked devices against him as poisonous adders and evil trappers The psalmist voices his confidence in Yahweh, certain that the righteous will rejoice in the deliverance The psalmist asks that Yahweh would guard his words and his works from the alluring temptations of the wicked in order that they will see his triumphant song of testimony The psalmist asks Yahweh to preserve him from the snare of the wicked and destroy them with it Addressing the congregation : The psalmist will pour out his complaint aloud before Yahweh.

Complaint: The psalmist voices his overwhelming complaint to Yahweh, asking Him to answer him in righteousness although none are righteous , remembering His ways Prayer: The psalmist prays from his soul for deliverance and guidance from Yahweh because he trusts in Him The psalmist, marveling that God takes note of perishing man, prays for divine intervention in the battle, expressing confidence that God will deliver his king The psalmist is confident that the nation will experience peace and prosperity because Yahweh delivers his anointed in battle David vows to praise Yahweh everyday because of His mighty and marvelous acts which one generation lauds to another David extols Yahweh as being merciful and gracious and then praises the prospects of His everlasting kingdom David extols Yahweh as being righteous and gracious and then praises him for the way he responds to man Call to praise: The psalmist calls to praise and exhorts his soul to trust in Yahweh 1b Cause for Praise: The psalmist praises Yahweh because he not only is grate, but because he is faithful and just to the oppressed The psalmist calls all of heaven and its hosts to praise Yahweh because He has established them by decree The psalmist calls all the earth and its hosts to praise Yahweh because He has exalted the horn of His people Cause for Praise: the psalmist calls Israel to praise Yahweh because he takes pleasure in His people, He beautifies the meek with salvation The psalmist calls for praise to be given for His mighty excellence in the things He does 2.

The psalmist calls for praise to be given with all manner of musical means The psalmist finally calls for every thing that has breath to praise Yahweh 6. One can only speak of an argument for the book in the sense of the canonical arrangement of the psalms e. However, the logic connected with the canonical arrangement of the psalms is speculative. Most understand the five-fold arrangement of the psalms to be reflective of the Pentateuch--at least in terms of the symbolic significance of the five-fold breakdown. However, there is no clear concnection with the writings of Moses beyond the number of books.

While not without difficulties, this canonical synthesis seems more plausible than that of the Pentateuch. Therefore, The headings for the Books of Psalms will follow the historical unfolding of the Davidic Covenant throughout the canonized Psalter. However, the argument of the canon will not be extended to the individual psalms even though the logic may often be carried in the message statements.

After fleeing, David takes refuge in the hill country of Ziph, but is betrayed by the people. Yahweh, not Baal, is mighty over the strength of the great flood; His house is holy. Latest Articles Q. What Denomination Does Bible. Psalms Of Kindness. Ways to Explain the Gospel. You are here Home. PSALM 1: Contrasts in Character The psalmist describes the blessed man who leads an untarnished and prosperous life in accord with the word of Yahweh, and contrasts him with the ungodly man who shall perish A.

The psalmist describes the blessed man who leads an untarnished and prosperous life in accord with the word of Yahweh B. By contrast, the psalmist describes the ungodly man C. The Psalmist concludes that the ungodly shall perish because Yahweh knows the way of the righteous 6 II. The Psalmist reveals how the nations foolishly desire to rebel against Yahweh and His anointed king B. The psalmist reveals the affirmation of the King to show by what right he rules D.


  1. Sins of Another!
  2. Expositions on the Psalms!
  3. Seeing God in His Temple: A Significant Theme in Israel’s Psalms.

While lamenting the amazing number of his adversaries who would destroy him, David finds a comforting confidence in the character of God B. While in the sorest strait, David calmly reposes because Yahweh sustains him C. PSALM 4: The Evening Song: Warnings to the Enemies Having cried out to God for help, the psalmist warns his enemies not to sin against God by wronging him because God has set him apart in protective care, a fact that gladdens his heart in the face of opposition A. The psalmist calls to God who makes room for him in straits 1 B. The psalmist earnestly warns his enemies not to wrong him, but to turn to trust in God who has lovingly set him apart C.

The psalmist joyfully expresses his peace and security in God in the face of opposition V. PSALM 5: The Morning Song: Confidence in God who hates Iniquity Entreating God to hear his morning prayer, the writer expresses his confidence in drawing near to God who hates iniquity and prays for divine leadership in the plain way along with the destruction of the wicked and blessing of those who love Yahweh A.

The writer entreats God to hear his heartfelt sigh and the voice of his lips in the morning prayer B. The writer expresses his confidence in going to God who hates iniquity C. The writer prays for guidance in the face of such destruction of the wicked, finding great confidence in the protection and the blessing of those who love Yahweh VI. The psalmist prays for deliverance from enemies B. The psalmist exhorts his adversaries to depart, issuing from his assurance that Yahweh has heard his prayer and will put them to shame VII. PSALM 7: Innocence before the Righteous Judge In praying for deliverance from his slanderous enemies, the hymnist solemnly protests his innocence and appeals to the righteous Judge of the earth to vindicate him by judging the wicked in their own conceived mischief A.

The poet confidently prays for deliverance from his slanderous enemies B. The poet, protesting his innocence before God, appeals to the righteous judge of the earth to manifest his righteousness in vindicating his cause C. Ponderings: The psalmist examines the marvelous theme that God should graciously entrust his dominion to man C.

Praise: The psalmist praises the excellency of the Name 9 IX. PSALM 9: Thanksgiving for Vindication Having praised Yahweh for manifesting His righteousness in the judgment on the wicked nations, and for being a true and eternal judge in whom the afflicted may trust, the psalmist prays that God will give him further cause to praise by seeing his affliction A.

Praise: The writer praises Yahweh, the true and eternal Judge, the hope of the afflicted, for manifesting His righteousness B. Prayer: The writer prays that the God who destroyed the wicked in the past will once again come to the aid of the afflicted X. PSALM The Oppression of the Wicked After describing the awesome power of the wicked in their impiety towards God and their lurking against the helpless, the poet appeals to God to rise and avenge the oppressed by breaking the wicked A.

The poet offers a forcible description of the wicked in his impiety towards God and his vicious power against the oppressed B. The poet appeals to God to rise and show himself the avenger of the afflicted and the destroyer of the wicked XI. PSALM Faith Rather Than Flight Faced with the temptation to flee at a time when the lawful authority is destroyed, the Psalmist hold fast to his faith in Yahweh who ultimately will destroy the wicked whom he hates and deliver the righteous whom he loves A.

The psalmist repudiates the temptation to flee in a time when lawful authority is destroyed B. The psalmist reiterates his steadfast trust in Yahweh who tries the children of men and will ultimately destroy the wicked because he loves righteousness XII.

PSALM Truth Among Deception In the midst of a culture oppressing the meek with deception and propaganda, the psalmist expresses confidence in the untarnished word of God which assures him that Yahweh will save the meek who seek His salvation A. The psalmist addresses Yahweh: He prays to Yahweh for the deliverance of the meek from a lying and arrogant people B. Yahweh addresses the psalmist: Yahweh assures the psalmist that He will deliver the meek who look on Him for salvation 5 C.

The psalmist addresses Yahweh: Although recognizing the presence of the wicked world around him, the psalmist expresses his confidence in the untarnished word of God XIII. The psalmist prays to Yahweh a B. The psalmist, assured that his prayer has been heard, resolves to praise Yahweh for dealing bountifully with him 5b-c XIV. The psalmist reveals the outcome of the struggle between the workers of iniquity and the righteous generation C. Question: The psalmist asks who may abide in the presence of Yahweh 1 B. Answer: The psalmist describes the flawless character of the man who may draw near to Yahweh and abide in his presence XVI.

The psalmist reviews how he came to know and trust Yahweh as his portion in life B. PSALM Protection from Worldly Men Conscious of his own uprightness and surrounded by enemies whose portion is in his life only, the psalmist prays to be kept from the evil world oppressing him as he looks to a bright future A. The psalmist confidently appeals that his cause is right and his life upright B. The psalmist prays to be kept from the evil world because they are full of vicious pride C.

Expositions Psalms, First Edition

The psalmist looks to the bright future in contrast to the present persecution by worldly men XVIII. David reviews all that Yahweh is to him in his vow to prayer B. David rejoices in the many blessings that God, the Rock, has given to him, and acknowledges the living God among the nations XIX.

The Psalmist describes the dominating influence of the efficacious law of Yahweh C. The psalmist prays for complete cleansing so that he may live an upright and acceptable life XX. PSALM Trusting in the Name of Yahweh Having rehearsed the intercessory prayer of the people for their monarch who is praying for victory, the king expresses the assurance he has received from Yahweh for an overwhelming victory because he believes A. The psalmist who is king expresses the assurance that because he trusts in the Name of Yahweh he shall have an overwhelming victory C.

The assembled worshipers respond in unison with a prayer that Yahweh will demonstrate that assured salvation 9 XXI. PSALM Triumph of the King The psalmist rejoices in the strength of Yahweh who has responded to the faith of the king with an overwhelming victory and finds added encouragement from the faithful who anticipate future victory by the power of Yahweh A.

The royal psalmist rejoices in the strength of Yahweh who has given him the victory in the battle because he trusted in him B. Because the king trusts in Yahweh, the congregation anticipates that not only shall he never be moved, but he shall defeat his enemies convincingly C. The congregation vows to sing and praise the might and power of Yahweh who alone is to be exalted 13 XXII. PSALM Hope Beyond the Cross NT Apparently forsaken by the God of his youth, the God of his fathers, and surrounded by the scornful persecution of his enemies, the suffering psalmist laments his desperate struggle with death, asking God to deliver him from such a horrible death and is heard so that he is able to declare to the world and the elect that Yahweh triumphs A.

Introduction: David, apparently forsaken by Yahweh, and scorned by his enemies, is confident that God, the God of his fathers and of his youth, will not abandon him B. Lament: David laments his desperate struggle with death under the figure of death by crucifixion at the hands of inhuman enemies C. Petition: David prays that Yahweh will deliver him from such a death, and finds an answer D. PSALM The Ministries of Yahweh Against the background of a pasture, a banquet hall, and the temple, David recalls the many ministries of Yahweh to him in the dangers of life and concludes that persistent loving protection will restore him to full communion A.

David meditates on the ministries of Yahweh to him under the figures of the pasture and the banquet hall B. David concludes that since the good loyal love of Yahweh will pursue him always, he shall return to full communion in the house of Yahweh 6 XXIV. The psalmist submits that those of clean hands and pure heart may ascend to the holy place of Yahweh B. The psalmist is not ashamed to turn to Yahweh for instruction and forgiveness of the sins of his youth B. The psalmist reiterates his prayer to Yahweh for instruction of the true way and forgiveness for the afflicted soul who looks to Him for redemption XXVI.

PSALM Separation from Sinners The man who keeps himself separate from sinners and clearly identifies himself with the worship of Yahweh can petition Yahweh with confidence to spare him from a common fate with the sinner A. The Psalmist offers a twofold introductory petition asserting his integrity B.

Catalogue of Commentaries & Expositions

The psalmist proves his integrity by demonstrating that he keeps himself separate from sinners and identifies himself with the worship of Yahweh C. The psalmist petitions Yahweh to spare him from a common fate with sinners with whom he has not associated XXVII. PSALM A Song of Courageous Trust The psalmist, expressing great confidence in Yahweh in spite of a host of enemies who threaten his life, prays for help and comfort in his time of need and rejoices in the hope of waiting on Yahweh A. David expresses great confidence in Yahweh in spite of the host of enemies B.

PSALM A confident Cry for Help Assured that Yahweh will distinguish him from the wicked by permanently overthrowing the wicked while preserving him in his distress, the psalmist prays that God will grant eternal salvation to his people A. Address to Yahweh: The psalmist petitions Yahweh to distinguish him from the wicked by saving him from a common fate with them B.

Address to the congregation: Confident of an answer to his prayer, the psalmist prophesies the permanent overthrow of the wicked and praises Yahweh C. Call to praise: The psalmist calls upon the sons of the Mighty to glorify Yahweh in holy array B. Conclusion: The psalmist concludes that Yahweh sits as King forever and is able to share his strength and peace with his people XXX. David recalls his prayer for deliverance from the sin of independence C.

David rehearses his deliverance XXXI.

Psalter, Psaltery

PSALM Trust in Trouble The psalmist exhorts the afflicted to love Yahweh and to be strong because Yahweh will be a cover to them from the plots of men, a truth he learned when he committed his spirit into the hands of Yahweh when his foes plotted to kill him A. Address: The psalmist turns to Yahweh in his time of need B. Confidence: The psalmist confidently commits his life into the hands of Yahweh, his Rock C. Lament: The psalmist pleads for grace because he is in distress D. Petition Proper: Emphasizing that he has placed himself into the hands of Yahweh, the psalmist petitions Yahweh to save him and to silence his enemies E.

The Cause for Praise: The psalmist gives the cause for praise--Yahweh is the righteous, just and loyal one C. PSALM Praise for Deliverance with Instruction Having called the congregation to praise Yahweh with him for their salvation, and having drawn the conclusion that God is good to those who trust him, the psalmist instructs the congregation on how to achieve long life A. The psalmist calls the congregation to praise Yahweh with him because he saved him and draws the general conclusion that God is good to his people B. The psalmist exhorts the congregation to learn from him how to achieve long life C.

PSALM Hating Without a Cause In three laments, each emphasizing one element of a typical lament psalm, the psalmist petitions Righteous Yahweh to deliver him from and to render poetic justice against his adversaries because they hate him without a cause A. With emphasis on the introductory petition, the psalmist petitions Yahweh to deliver him from and to render poetic justice against his enemies for they hate him without a cause B.

With emphasis on lament, the psalmist demonstrates that he is hated without a cause and therefore asks for help C. With emphasis on petition, the psalmist petitions Yahweh to deliver him from and to render poetic justice against those that stir up strife by their mendacious accusations against those at peace XXXVI.

PSALM Preservation from Evil Men Having received an oracle concerning the philosophy and practice of the unbeliever as he plots his wicked schemes, and having found relief in an experiential knowledge of the glorious attributes of Yahweh which bring abundant blessings to the believer, the psalmist prays that Yahweh would continue his loyal love and righteousness so that the wicked might not destroy his integrity A.

The psalmist receives an oracle concerning the philosophy and the practice of the wicked who schemes evil B. The psalmist finds relief in a description of the attributes of Yahweh which brings abundant blessing to the life of the believer C. PSALM: Fret Not Using a collection of proverbial expressions, the psalmist exhorts the righteous to trust in Yahweh continually and fret not the evil man who will be cast down ultimately A.

The psalmist warns the congregation not to fret the evil man but to trust in Yahweh B. The psalmist describes the judgment of the wicked in a series of contrasts with the righteous C. The psalmist delineates the blessings of Yahweh on the righteous D. PSALM: The Song for Sorrows Being severely chastened by the hand of Yahweh for personal sin, and being grievously plagued by his adversaries, the psalmist petitions Yahweh to deliver him from both afflictions because his hope is in Yahweh to whom he confesses iniquity A.

The psalmist offers his introductory petition for Yahweh to stop chastening him B. The psalmist laments his sufferings C. The psalmist expresses his confidence in Yahweh D. Past reflection and petition: The afflicted poet, having resolved not to sin against God by faulting Him, sought relief from his anguish by asking God to help him to submit himself to the knowledge that god has determined a brief life for man B. PSALM The Song of Sacrificial Service Having gladly offered himself as a sacrifice to God for the innumerable acts of salvation granted to him, the psalmist prays for a hasty rescue from the multitude of present evils A.

PSALM A Prayer for Help Against Treachery Recalling his prayer for revenge on those who did not show mercy but took advantage of his illness, the writer instructs that the one who takes note of the needy obtains deliverance A. Speaking to the congregation, the psalmist instructs them that the merciful obtain mercy B.

Speaking to the congregation, the psalmist supports the maxim by recalling his prayer for revenge on those who did not show him mercy but took advantage of his illness C. PSALM 42 Yearning in his soul for restoration to communion with the living God and lamenting the fact that his adversaries like great billows have stormed over him, the psalmist petitions Yahweh to lead him back to the temple that he might find rest for his soul A. The psalmist years for the living God as he is taunted by the enemies in his life, but finds hope that he will yet praise him B. The psalmist laments the act that his enemies like great billows have stormed over him, but hinds hope that he will yet praise him C.

Israel expresses confidence in Yahweh B. Israel complains of her present humiliating defeat C. Israel protests her innocence before Yahweh D. Israel petitions God for help XLV. The psalmist praises the royal bridegroom on his wedding day B. The psalmist charges the bride on attaining the proper relationship before she is conducted to the palace C. The psalmist magnifies God as the sure defense of the saints who do not fear perils B.

The psalmist observes that the peace of Zion is secured by the presence of God who destroys her foes C. The psalmist calls upon all the people to do homage to Yahweh because He has proved Himself to be King of all the earth B. The psalmist praises God and ascribes glory and security to Zion the city of God B. The psalmist describes the defeat of the enemies of Zion because God loves and dwells there C.

PSALM A Dark Saying on a Harp: Redemption, not Wealth The wise poet calls the world to listen to his dark saying for he has observed the prosperous and the rich who are purred up with pride and false security and concluded that they are no better than the beasts of the field, for in the end the hope of the righteous brings the only consolation A. Introduction: The wise man calls the world to listen to his inspired saying B. Observation: The wise man has observed the prosperous and the rich who are puffed up with pride and false security: their glory is temporary C.

Conclusion: The wise man concludes that the doom of the arrogant man is final, but the hope of the righteous man is eternal L. Asaph presents the scene of judgment with Yahweh appearing to judge his people B. Confession: David confesses that he has sinned against God and laments his moral impotence C.

Petition: David petitions God for forgiveness and a moral renewal that will restore fellowship and joy D. Vow: If forgiven, David promises to praise God, restore others to Him, and offer the sacrifice of a spirit and mind broken of all self-assertion E. Epilogue: David petitions God to prosper Jerusalem after which he anticipates that lawful sacrifices will again be accepted LII.

The psalmist portrays the treacherous tongue of Doeg and predicts his total ruin B. The psalmist portrays his blessed fate and faith and promises to acknowledge and hope in God for ever LIII. David petitions God for deliverance from his enemies B. David confidently asserts his trust in God, vowing to praise Him for the deliverance LV.

The psalmist calls on god to head his restless complaint and deliver him from the terrifying oppression from which he longs to escape B. The psalmist calls on god to destroy the wicked for they have filled with violence the city because of wickedness, bemoaning the fact that the wicked have betrayed him C.

The psalmist expresses his personal confidence in Yahweh who has redeemed him in battle and who will deliver him from the deceitful, destructive men LVI. The psalmist confidently petitions Yahweh to destroy those that lie in hiding waiting to destroy him B. The psalmist reiterates his confidence in Yahweh who is concerned about him, and vows to acknowledge his deliverance LVII.

PSALM Deliverance from the Exalted God Using as his refrain the desire for God to be exalted, the psalmist calls out for salvation by divine intervention from the destructive enemies and then sings a song of triumph to His loyal love and truth in the full expectation that the wicked will be caught in their own snare A. The psalmist cries to God for divine intervention to rescue him from the enemies who would destroy him and then expresses his desire for the exaltation of God B. PSALM Unrighteous Judges David denounces the unrighteous judges who from the first are wickedly poisonous in their work, calling for God to destroy them irrevocably and swiftly and anticipating that the righteous will be strengthened in their cause A.

By means of questions and answers, the psalmist decries the unrighteous judges who wickedly go astray and poison others B.

The 23rd Psalm

The psalmist calls for God to destroy the wicked judges swiftly and irrevocably C. The psalmist anticipates the joy of those who will see the vengeance and will conclude that righteousness is right and worthwhile LIX. PSALM Defense from Bloody Men The innocent psalmist petitions Yahweh on the basis of His loyal-love to set him securely on high above his bloody enemies and to humiliate these arrogant boasters in such a way that all will know that Yahweh is the One who rules A. The psalmist turns to Yahweh to deliver him out of his disparate situation for he is innocent B.

CHURCH FATHERS: Expositions on the Psalms (Augustine)

The psalmist likens his enemies to ravenous dogs and by quoting them shows them to be practical atheists C. The psalmist is confident that Yahweh who mocks the heathen and loves his own will cause him to see victory over his enemies D. The psalmist petitions Yahweh to destroy the arrogant blasphemers in such a way that all will know that Yahweh is the One who rules E. PSALM Prayer for Victory in the Face of Defeat Knowing that both victory and defeat come from the hand of Yahweh, the psalmist petitions Him on behalf of the nation to help them achieve victory over their enemies Moab, Edom, and Ammon on the basis of promised triumph A.

Psalmist speaks: the psalmist turns to Yahweh for the deliverance of the nation, rehearsing their lamentable predicament, their mission in the world, and their relationship to Yahweh B. God speaks: God assures the psalmist of victory by exulting in the fact that both land and tribes are His and the nations will be subjugated C. PSALM Prayer to the Rock Higher than I When feeling faint and inadequate, the psalmist finds assurance in the strength of the Rock that is higher and encouragement in the promises that endure forever A.

David petitions Yahweh for strength and security when his heart is overwhelmed within B. David expresses his confidence in Yahweh who promised strength and security C. PSALM My Soul Waits in Silence In silence David waits for God, his strength and security, to deliver him from his deceitful enemies, contrasting the security of trusting in God with the folly of trusting in the vanity of men which is powerless A. Waiting silently for God, his strength and security, to deliver him, David marvels at the efforts of some to thrust him down B.

Waiting silently for God, his strength and security, David instructs the saints to put their trust in Him C. Body: The psalmist satisfies his soul by praising God for the loyal love for the richness of the spirit, and for the help C. Conclusion: The psalmist confidently anticipates the destruction of the liars who seek to kill him LXIV.

PSALM Poetic Justice for Evil Tongues Having prayed for protection from those who conspire against him, and having depicted their malicious schemes for the destruction of the innocent, the psalmist anticipates the intervention of God to turn the scheme upon the schemers causing terror in the wicked and joy in the righteous A. The psalmist prays for protection from those who conspire against him B.

The psalmist characterizes his enemies, depicting their malicious schemes for the destruction of the innocent C. The psalmist prophesies the intervention of God who will turn the destructive scheme upon the schemers themselves, causing great terror among the unrighteous but great joy among the righteous LXV. The psalmist expresses his assurance that God will cover his sin and bless him abundantly B. The psalmist expresses his assurance that the Saving God will answer prayer and bring full restitution that will cause fear and joy C.

The people call upon all the earth to praise God because He has delivered Israel from their oppressors throughout history, demonstrating that He is sovereign in the earth B.


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  • The psalmist, the leaders of the people, offers the declarative praise to God with sacrifice and words of praise to the congregation LXVII. The psalmist calls the people to praise God for His righteous and equitable judgment C. The psalmist calls the peoples of the earth to praise God because the earth has yielded its increase and all the earth will respond LXVIII. Reviewing the development of Yahweh choice of Mount Zion, the psalmist pictures the movement from wilderness to conquest and occupation C.

    Realizing that the strength of God is displayed in Israel and given to His people, the psalmist calls the nations to praise the Rider of the heavens LXIX. PSALM Zeal for the House of Yahweh Bearing the reproach and the rejection of even his brothers because he is zealous for the house of Yahweh, the psalmist confidently petitions Yahweh to save him from destruction A.

    Turning to Yahweh with his cry for help, the psalmist describes his lamentable state B. Petitioning Yahweh to save him from imminent death, the psalmist expresses his confidence that Yahweh knows his distress and will punish the enemies D. Confident that Yahweh will set him on high, the psalmist resolves to praise; confident that God will save Zion, the psalmist anticipates the psalmist of creation LXX.

    The psalmist prays for a hasty deliverance from his present evil plight and anticipates the rejoicing that will follow A. The psalmist prays for Yahweh to make haste to help 1 B. The psalmist prays that his enemies be put to shame C. PSALM The Faith of An Aging Saint Anticipating the same marvelous response that Yahweh has manifested all his life, and vowing to give praise as he has done from his youth, an again saint confidently petitions to be delivered from those who seek his harm and deride his faith A.

    Introduction: The psalmist turns to Yahweh for help in his time of need B. PSALM The Everlasting Dominion of the Righteous King Fully expecting that the king will reign in righteousness and peace on behalf of the oppressed, and that his dominion will extend from sea to sea over many kings, the psalmist prays for the blessings of peace and prosperity, attesting that because he is a savior of the oppressed, he is worthy of honor and power and dominion A.

    The psalmist prays that God will give righteous judgments to the king so that he may rule in righteousness and peace on behalf of the oppressed B. The psalmist anticipates that the kingdom will extend from sea to sea over many kings C. The psalmist attests that the king is worthy of such honor and power and dominion because he is savior of the oppressed D. PSALM The End of the Wicked, the Glory of the Righteous Telling of his doubts which nearly overwhelmed him when he compared the life of the worldling with himself, the psalmist confesses the sinfulness of his thoughts and explains that a contrast of destinies enabled him to overcome A.

    The time had not yet come when life and immortality would be brought to light by the Gospel, but the germs of these great New Testament truths are found in the Psalms. The whole history is prophetic. It is not enough to recognize that the Old Testament contains prophecies; the Old Testament is one vast prophecy. We may say that the three strands which make the web of Hebrew prophecy relate to the Messiah, Israel , and the Gentiles.

    All three are found in the Psalter, and it must be evident that they are vitally related to one another. Examine carefully these and kindred passages. That this consummation is to be reached through Israel does not need to be argued. But behind and beneath Israelitish and Gentile prophecy is Messianic prophecy, of which the Psalter is full.

    Compare, e. Psalm with Matt. The Messianic reference in some of the Psalms must be obvious to all who read, but far more numerous are references which are not so obvious, but which the New Testament warrants us in regarding as Messianic. These references tell of His Manhood: , 5 Heb. It must not be supposed because these Scriptures are poetical that we cannot expect to find in them any theological instruction. Revelation of God may be made in ways other than by dogmatic statement. Will any one say that the hymns of the Reformation period, and of the Evangelical Revival have no theological value because they are hymns?

    At least it will be conceded that in the names of God used in the Psalter we may see dogmatic truth, for these names represent Divine qualities, attributes and attitudes. Their value here is just what it is wherever they are found in the Old Testament. From this we shall see what a range and wealth of revelation concerning God there is in the Psalms.

    His names stand for His nature and they always bear an appropriate relation to their context. Viewing them together it is not difficult to construct a Psalter Theology. The psalmists firmly believed in the Personality of God. To them He was no abstraction, and very rarely do they use abstract terms when speaking of Him. Their attitude was devotional and not speculative, and their devotion was rooted in the firm belief that Jehovah was a Person, living and acting. And their faith was equally firm concerning the Unity of God.

    This is rarely stated but it is everywhere assumed. Psalm , should read:. To these a third and great truth is added, that of the Eternity of God, which is set forth in matchless words in Psalm , 2, 4. These three truths, the Personality, Unity,, and Eternity of God, are the foundation on which the Bible revelation rests, and they were and are tenaciously held by all devout Hebrews and Christians.

    But let us not suppose that they thought of Him only as vastly great and terribly august. This nearness and dearness of God to them is never far from their thought. Circumstances at times obscure the light of His face, but soon again do they bask in its comforting rays. What the psalmists did see they saw aright, and but for their faith we would never have heard of them. It is probably this which appeals to the vast majority who read these Songs. Most readers are wanting in either the time or the inclination to study the literary, historical, ethical, prophetical, and theological aspects of the Psalter, and yet multitudes in all ages have resorted to these ancient Poems, and have derived therefrom cheer for their tasks, strength for their burdens, courage for their battles, comfort for their sorrows, light for their journey, and hope for their ventures.

    This is accounted for by the fact that there are in the Psalter universal and permanent elements, elements which appeal, not to any one race or age, but to the heart of mankind. We are all tempted in some way or another; trouble overtakes us all some time or another; we are all sometimes shaken by doubt, and stricken by disappointment; and also, we all have our great days, our times of prosperity, our seasons of ecstasy.

    We are all creatures of moods on which circumstances play, now lifting us up to the mountain top, and now casting us down into the valley. These Psalms are intensely personal and religious in complexion. Nature scenes are described with wonderful power, as in 19, 29, 33, 65, ; historical summaries are recorded with telling effect, as in 78, , , and national aspirations are sung with all that fervour of which the Hebrews were capable, as in 45, 47, 67, 81; but the note that dominates the Psalter is the personal; here are the sighs and the songs of the soul to God;, here ascend the prayers and praises of individuals who represent infinitely varied experiences.

    In some instances Psalms which were used in the Temple worship were not originally written for it, but were later adapted for that purpose.

    St. Augustin's Expositions on The Book of Psalms 1888 9780766183988

    Though these Songs were written for distant generations and in circumstances which can scarcely arise in our modern world, yet they appeal to the experiences of all ages, and fit into the circumstances of all mankind; and after thirty centuries are as living to-day as when they were first written. Men of every school of thought have felt and spoken of the Psalms in this way. James commends this practice and, no doubt, Paul and Silas acted upon it in the Philippian gaol.

    It would seem that antiphonal singing of the Psalms was practised in the second century of our era, and Jerome, writing to Marcella, tells her that these Psalms were universally sung. Later still we find the Psalms wrought into the liturgical schemes of the Western and Eastern Churches. What is there necessary for man to know which the Psalms are not able to teach? There are many ways in which the Psalms may be read so often in a year—as indeed they should be—and the following Table may serve as a basic plan.

    The scale is one month. You will observe that the plan provides for the reading of five Psalms a day. That there may be no confusion as to which Psalms fall on any given date, the first of the five corresponds to the date, and each of the other four is found by adding thirty a month , which makes the unit the same throughout. If it be felt that Psalm is too long for one day, with four other Psalms, it may be distributed over the last twenty-two days of the month, a section of eight verses each day, beginning on the ninth of the month.

    In this way the reader in course of time will readily recall what each Psalm is about, and also will be able without difficulty to classify the Psalms. The following Works are confidently recommended to the general reader for their practical usefulness. In one volume Three volumes. A new translation, and expositions characterized by the felicity and beauty of expression for which we look in all the works of this writer. Seven volumes. A library in itself.

    Spurgeon is inimitable, and these volumes reveal him at his best. Specially valuable for quotations from old authors. Commended alike for soul and service. The literary form of the Text is the outstanding feature of this volume. The expositions exhibit much spiritual and critical insight. Theological Library, Vol. Showing the undesigned coincidences of the Psalms with the independent Scripture histories, confirming and illustrating both.

    A valuable volume. The first two Psalms, which are anonymous, provide an introduction to the whole Psalter, the Hymn Book of the Hebrews. The first treats of the Law, and the second, of Prophecy, and these are the foci around which the whole of the Old Testament moves as in an ellipse. The problem of the sufferings of the righteous and the prosperity of the wicked belongs to every age. The righteous are blessed and the wicked are cursed; that is the plain fact, and that is the subject of this Psalm. The Tree and the Chaff would be a good title.

    Think about that. The Poem is in two parts: 1, The Godly Man He is described first negatively 1 , then positively 2 , and then consequently 3. Observe then that there are three things the godly man will not do 1. Mark carefully the triple triplets:. They denote successive steps in a career of evil, and each category moves towards a climax. There is a negative side to goodness. But there is also a positive 2. It is of your Master. In part two the picture is reversed They are not trees, but chaff.

    The one defies the storm, but the other is driven before it. He who stands in the way of sinners 1 shall not stand in the judgment 5. There are only the Two Ways and the Two Ends 6. To which do you belong? Read Matthew What Jerome saith on St. Psalm 1 called attention to the Law 2 ; this one directs our thought to Prophecy , and these are the two ruling notes of the Old Testament Luke This marvellous poem is in four stanzas; and it is dramatic in form. Observe the wild commotion of the many 1 and of the mighty 2a ; the outward tumult and the inward cause 1 ; the array of the kings, and the plot of the rulers 2a.

    Also, the object of their enmity , Jehovah and His Messiah 2b : and, their daring proposal 3 , to snap the bands of divine restraint and to fling away the cords of the yoke. That is a picture of the world to-day; and it will bring down—. Now follows:. He is divinely attested 7. His dominion is to be universal 8. He possesses by conquest. This, therefore, cannot refer to the evangelization of the heathen to-day.

    Subjugation to-day is not by breaking and dashing; but it will be some day. Now, finally—. Be wise, be instructed, serve, rejoice, kiss, trust. Yet kiss Him not as did Judas. A careful reading of Psalms 3 and 4 will show that they are closely related in structure, circumstances, and time. In each are four stanzas; each reflects a time of great danger, and that danger appears to be one and the same in both Psalms. Read 2 Samuel Psalm 3 is a morning hymn 5 , and Psalm 4 an evening hymn 8.

    In this Psalm each stanza, except the third, ends with Selah , which means—pause, think. The wave which threatens to overwhelm him is growing in volume and momentum; his cause is pronounced hopeless. Have you ever felt like that? Yet, his trust in God remains unshaken 3,4. The writer derives comfort from past experience. It had been his habit to pray, and the Lord had always answered him 4. But his present experience also, justified his confidence 5. He is speaking of the morning after a night of refreshing sleep—not in bed! It is not the sleep of exhaustion, but of trust in God, Who sustains him all the time Heb.

    Numbers are not everything 6. Absalom had the crowd, but David had God, and one with God is a majority. David ends with prayer, first for himself 7 , and then for the nation 8. Many had risen against him 1 : so he asks the Lord to arise for him. He makes his expectation to rest on his experience 7b : what God had done, He could and would do.

    Let us pray. Evening and morning thanksgiving. God only knows whether I shall survive this year. I sometimes think my health is giving way, but His will be done. Twelve days later the Dean passed away at the age of sixty-one: but after two generations his Greek New Testament is still a mine of wealth. For fragments of secular poetry see Gen.

    Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review. A Guide to the Psalms by W. Graham Scroggie quantity. Graham Scroggie Books. Graham Scroggie Four Volumes in One www. Attention is called to the following features: An attempt is made by the arrangement of the text, to indicate to some extent the principle of parallelism so characteristic of Hebrew poetry. Further details will be found in the Introduction.

    The acrostic Psalms are shown by the Hebrew alphabet in the left-hand margin. Among these forms are the following: 1 Synonymous Parallelism, in which the same thing is repeated in different words; in which the second member enforces the thought of the first. For He hath founded it upon the seas. And established it upon the floods. Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? Or who shall stand in His holy place? For the Lord knoweth the way of the righteous, But the way of the ungodly shall perish. For evil doers shall be cut off; But those that wait upon the Lord, they shall inherit the earth.

    The law of the Lord is perfect. Converting the soul: The testimony of the Lord is sure. Making wise the simple: The statutes of the Lord are right, Rejoicing the heart: The commandments of the Lord are pure, Enlightening the eyes: The fear of the Lord is clean.

    Enduring for ever: The judgments of the Lord are true. And righteous altogether. The floods have lifted up, O Lord, The floods have lifted up their voice: The floods lift up their waves. O Israel, trust thou in the Lord: He is their help and their shield. O house of Aaron, trust in the Lord: He is their help and their shield. Ye that fear the Lord, trust in the Lord: He is their help and their shield.

    Give unto the Lord, O ye mighty, Give unto the Lord glory and strength. As the heaven is high above the earth, So great is His mercy toward them that fear Him. As far as the east is from the west, So far hath He removed our transgressions from us. A, Another device employed by the Hebrew poet is the alphabetic acrostic. Kirkpatrick makes a five-fold classification of these descriptive notes. A Prayer Occurs five times: Psalms , 86, 90, , A Praise Occurs once: Psalm See the diagrams on pages 14, Here are: Allegory.

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    He shall be like a tree. The ungodly … are like the chaff. Thou shalt eat the labour of thine hands. Thou lovest all devouring words, O thou deceitful tongue. All the night make I my bed to swim. All my bones shall say. Lord, who is like unto Thee? What ailed thee, O thou sea, that thou fleddest? Thou Jordan, that thou wast driven back? Confining ourselves to the Psalter, it has been said that the psalmists, especially David, exhibit a spirit of Pharisaic self-righteousness as, for example, in the words: I was also upright before Him, And I kept myself from mine iniquity.

    Therefore hath the Lord recompensed me According to my righteousness. According to the cleanness of my hands in His eyesight Psalm , Other examples are, , 4, 8; , 15; , 11; ; , 4; ; ; I waited patiently for the Lord. As the hart panteth after the water-brooks, So panteth my soul after Thee, O God. My soul waiteth for the Lord More than they that watch for the morning: I say, More than they that watch for the morning. Adon and Adonai mean Sovereign Lord; the latter being an emphatic form of the former.

    El means the Strong Mighty One. For who in the skies can be compared unto Jehovah? Who is like unto Jehovah among the sons of El? Kirkpatrick In one volume Stewart Perowne Two volumes. Explanatory and Critical. Full of light and help. Sharpe A mine of information. Spurgeon Seven volumes. Davison An Introduction to the Psalter, scholarly and devout.

    Rotherham The literary form of the Text is the outstanding feature of this volume. Fausset Theological Library, Vol.